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Eat, Pay, Love | The Verge

Mitch’s Take: Look, I served on the founding board of Match.com, so I am not a prude when it comes to how people should connect. The latest trends in dating — these paid-to-date services — as well as in the amateurization of pornography, are leading women to treat their bodies as a commodity. In this […]

Mitch’s Take: Look, I served on the founding board of Match.com, so I am not a prude when it comes to how people should connect. The latest trends in dating — these paid-to-date services — as well as in the amateurization of pornography, are leading women to treat their bodies as a commodity. In this story, we hear women, primarily, struggling with the lack of intimacy expected before sex, as they rationalize using an app that is designed primarily to facilitate prostitution. That is unfortunate.

At Match.com, one of our early insights was the need to allow women to connect with other women for free (not allowed on ohlala, the app at the center of this story), so that they could protect themselves from creepy men. These apps don’t proviede that transparency. That’s dangerous.

Do I think it’s a good idea to make sex a commodity in the local, on-demand economy? Not my decision for everyone, but I wouldn’t wish it on my children, nor yours.

But the idea of paid dating is hardly new. And if it is, it’s just as new as the idea of dating itself. In her book Labor of Love: The Invention of Dating, Moira Weigel explains how dating as we know it today rose up around the turn of the century as a working class practicality — a way for urban singles living in cramped family apartments and boarding houses to get out and spend their wages while enjoying a little romance.

Source: Eat, Pay, Love | The Verge

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