Meet Marty, The Connected Couch; New ‘Nerve Center Of Media Use’ 06/23/2016

A couch that gets to know and market to you?

The world of IoT and connected objects in the home continues to heat up with the all-in-one connected couch, Marty. Created by Havas Group and just showcased at Cannes, Marty is the epitome of mergingmedia devices into a single point of control, as well as collecting all of the associated use data. Marty is the first prototype to come out of also newly announced Havas 18/35, which is a combinationof an innovation and fabrication lab and will house the group’s other innovation initiatives Lab 18, Collab and Innovation Lab.

Source: Meet Marty, The Connected Couch; New ‘Nerve Center Of Media Use’ 06/23/2016

How a Utah media company aims to take native advertising local – Columbia Journalism Review

Mitch’s Take: Shout-out to friend-of-the-feed Mike Orren, but also a very good read on the growing power of local media that emphasizes the actual local activities and communities they cover. There’s something to be said for the idea of creating a data-driven localism, and it’s useful to have a sales force to walk the sidewalks.

“The independence definitely helps us out,” says Mike Orren, president of Speakeasy. “But there’s no way we would have grown at the pace we did without The Dallas Morning News sales force.”

Speakeasy, a particularly ambitious venture that employs about two dozen, primarily produces content for advertisers’ own sites and manages their social media strategies. “We’ve done some native on the Dallas News site,” Orren says, “but on the low scale it doesn’t have the impact we’d like it to have.” (ComScore puts DallasNews.com’s May audience at 11.7 million unique visitors.)

Source: How a Utah media company aims to take native advertising local – Columbia Journalism Review

At Cannes, Unilever Shares 3 Keys to Bringing a Global Campaign to a Local Market | Adweek

Weed used Unilever campaigns encompassing what he termed the “three i’s”—individuals, influencers and impacts—to illustrate how the seemingly disparate ideas of global and local can coexist in a singular marketing push. Essentially, his was the not-so-new notion that global campaigns can be tailored to local markets and, thanks to technology, even people.

Source: At Cannes, Unilever Shares 3 Keys to Bringing a Global Campaign to a Local Market | Adweek

#AirbnbWhileBlack: When Discrimination and the Gig Economy Intersect – Law Street (TM)

Mitch’s Take: Note that only half of customers receive a positive review from Airbnb hosts in the presumed absence of discrimination. Half are negative, then? Why do Airbnb hosts put up with a barely positive experience, at best? Is Airbnb’s success a function of the struggling middle class? Could greater prosperity hurt Airbnb’s valuation as people take their rooms off the market?

Over the past year or so, as Airbnb has blossomed (the company is valued at $25 billion, with hosts in 34,000 cities, and 191 countries), travelers have increasingly been turned down by discriminatory hosts. A January study by the Harvard Business School offers data that buffers the anecdotal evidence: in the five American cities it covered, the study found African-American travelers received positive reviews 42 percent of the time. But 50 percent of white travelers received a positive review.

Source: #AirbnbWhileBlack: When Discrimination and the Gig Economy Intersect – Law Street (TM)

Policymakers should focus on ways to encourage the gig economy to grow

Among the policy prescriptions he offers to encourage more flexible workplace arrangements is to offer legal safe harbor to those platforms that agree to finance benefits for independent workers that mirror some of the basic safety net traditionally enjoyed through full-time employment, such as new forms of unemployment insurance, workers’ compensation, health coverage and other benefits. In exchange for funding these new “worker-controlled benefits exchanges,” firms that offer flexible work arrangements would no longer face a burden of proof to demonstrate that their contractors are not, in fact, employees.

Source: Policymakers should focus on ways to encourage the gig economy to grow

Lystable gets $11M Series A to push its gig economy SaaS in the US | TechCrunch

Ahoy there gig economy… Lystable, which makes a software tool focused on helping businesses manage freelancers, has closed an $11 million Series A round led..

Source: Lystable gets $11M Series A to push its gig economy SaaS in the US | TechCrunch

How much you can make as an Uber driver in Denver, Detroit, Houston – Business Insider

But a new report from Buzzfeed reveals the approximate hourly rates after expenses that drivers can earn in Denver, Houston, and Detroit, based on shared internal data.In late 2015 Uber drivers earned:

  • $13.17 per hour after expenses in the Denver market
  • $10.75 per hour after expenses in the Houston area
  • $8.77 per hour after expenses in the Detroit market

Source: How much you can make as an Uber driver in Denver, Detroit, Houston – Business Insider

Mobile advertiser tracked users’ locations, without their consent, FTC alleges – Computerworld

The privacy settings on your phone don’t mean much if tech companies choose to ignore them. One major mobile advertiser allegedly did just that.

Source: Mobile advertiser tracked users’ locations, without their consent, FTC alleges – Computerworld

Stop Settling for IT Mediocrity – & Manage Beyond ‘Meh’

How Did We Stoop So Low?

Both of these so-called “solutions” happened during a time when little was done to fundamentally make the underlying software, which runs the IT operations backbone, a better solution.

By “better” I don’t mean incremental code improvements. I mean becoming fundamentally better at delivering actionable information that enables an IT operations team to get better every day at improving business outcomes for the enterprise.

Source: Stop Settling for IT Mediocrity – & Manage Beyond ‘Meh’