About Mitch Ratcliffe

Mitch Ratcliffe is a veteran entrepreneur, journalist and business model hacker. He operates this site, which is a collection of the blogs he’s published over the years, as well as an archive of his professional publishing record. As always, this is a work in progress. Such is life.

IoT Spending This Year: $232 Billion; Biggest Revenue Growth: In-Store Marketing 06/24/2016

Among other things, there are large dollar amounts involved in the Internet of Things. Aside from the various projections of 20 billion or more Internet-connected devices coming, the investment frombusinesses is even more noteworthy. U.S. organizations will invest more than $232 billion in Internet of Things hardware, software, services and connectivity this year, based on the latest worldwidespending forecast from the International Data Corp. (IDC).

Source: IoT Spending This Year: $232 Billion; Biggest Revenue Growth: In-Store Marketing 06/24/2016

American Time Use Survey Summary

Some highlights of the updated American Time Use Survey from the U.S. Census:

On the days they worked, 82 percent of employed persons did some or all of their
     work at their workplace and 24 percent did some or all of their work at home. Employed
     persons spent more time working at the workplace than at home--8.0 hours compared with
     3.2 hours. (See table 6.)

   Compared to workers with less education, employed persons age 25 and over with a
     bachelor’s degree or higher were the least likely to work at their workplace on days
     they worked (74 percent), and they were the most likely to do some or all of their
     work from home (39 percent). By comparison, 94 percent of workers with less than a
     high school diploma worked at their workplace on days they worked and 7 percent worked
     from home. (See table 6.)

   --On the days they worked, 38 percent of persons employed in management, business, and
     financial operations and 35 percent of those employed in professional and related
     occupations did some or all of their work from home. Workers employed in other 
     occupations were less likely to work from home on days they worked. (See table 7.) 

   --Multiple jobholders were more likely to work on an average day than were single
     jobholders--80 percent compared with 67 percent. (For a definition of 'average day,'
     see the Technical Note.) Multiple jobholders also were more likely to work at home
     than were single jobholders--36 percent compared with 23 percent. (See table 6.)

Household Activities in 2015

   --On an average day, 85 percent of women and 67 percent of men spent some time doing
     household activities such as housework, cooking, lawn care, or financial and other
     household management. (See table 1.)

   --On the days they did household activities, women spent an average of 2.6 hours on
     such activities, while men spent 2.1 hours. (See table 1.)

   --On an average day, 22 percent of men did housework--such as cleaning or laundry--compared
     with 50 percent of women. Forty-three percent of men did food preparation or cleanup,
     compared with 70 percent of women. Men were slightly more likely to engage in lawn and
     garden care than were women--12 percent compared with 8 percent. (See table 1.)

   --From 2003 to 2015, the share of men doing food preparation and cleanup on an average
     day increased from 35 percent to 43 percent.  The average time per day men spent doing
     food preparation and cleanup increased by 5 minutes, from 16 minutes in 2003 to 21
     minutes in 2015. (See table 1.)

   --From 2003 to 2015, the share of women doing housework on an average day decreased
     from 54 percent to 50 percent. The average time per day women spent doing housework
     declined from 58 minutes in 2003 to 52 minutes in 2015. (See table 1.)

Leisure Activities in 2015

   --On an average day, nearly everyone age 15 and over (96 percent) engaged in some sort
     of leisure activity such as watching TV, socializing, or exercising. Of those who
     engaged in leisure activities, men spent more time in these activities (5.8 hours)
     than did women (5.1 hours). (See table 1.)

   --Watching TV was the leisure activity that occupied the most time (2.8 hours per day),
     accounting for more than half of leisure time, on average, for those age 15 and over.
     Socializing, such as visiting with friends or attending or hosting social events, was
     the next most common leisure activity, accounting for 41 minutes per day. (See table 1.)

   --Men were more likely than women to participate in sports, exercise, or recreation on
     a given day--23 percent compared with 18 percent. On days they participated, men also
     spent more time in these activities than did women--1.7 hours compared with 1.2 hours.
     (See table 1.)

   --On an average day, adults age 75 and over spent 7.8 hours engaged in leisure activities--
     more than any other age group; 35- to 44-year-olds spent 4.0 hours engaged in leisure
     and sports activities--less than other age groups. (See table 11.)

   --Time spent reading for personal interest and playing games or using a computer for
     leisure varied greatly by age. Individuals age 75 and over averaged 1.1 hours of
     reading per weekend day and 20 minutes playing games or using a computer for leisure.
     Conversely, individuals ages 15 to 19 read for an average of 8 minutes per weekend day
     and spent 1.3 hours playing games or using a computer for leisure. (See table 11.)

   --Employed adults living in households with no children under age 18 engaged in leisure
     activities for 4.5 hours per day, 1.1 hours more than employed adults living with a
     child under age 6. (See table 8B.)

Care of Household Children for the period 2011-2015

   --Adults living in households with children under age 6 spent an average of 2.0 hours per
     day providing primary childcare to household children. Adults living in households where
     the youngest child was between the ages of 6 and 17 spent less than half as much time
     providing primary childcare to household children--49 minutes per day. Primary childcare
     is childcare that is done as a main activity, such as providing physical care or reading
     to children. (See table 9.)

   --On an average day, among adults living in households with children under age 6, women
     spent 1.0 hour providing physical care (such as bathing or feeding a child) to household
     children; by contrast, men spent 25 minutes providing physical care. (See table 9.)

   --Adults living in households with at least one child under age 6 spent an average of 5.3
     hours per day providing secondary childcare--that is, they had at least one child in
     their care while doing activities other than primary childcare. Secondary childcare
     provided by adults living in households with children under age 6 was most commonly
     provided while doing leisure activities (2.1 hours) or household activities (1.3 hours).
     (See table 10.)

   --Adults living in households with children under age 6 spent more time providing primary
     childcare on an average weekday (2.1 hours) than on an average weekend day (1.8 hours).
     However, they spent less time providing secondary childcare on weekdays than on weekend
     days--4.5 hours compared with 7.4 hours. (See tables 9 and 10.)

Source: American Time Use Survey Summary

Facebook Live grows up with two-person broadcasts and waiting rooms for viewers | TechCrunch

Today at VidCon Facebook pre-announced three new big product updates for Facebook Live, their live-streaming platform built into Facebook. The platform will..

Source: Facebook Live grows up with two-person broadcasts and waiting rooms for viewers | TechCrunch

Alexandria Column: Gig Economy Hits Home

A state representative wrestles with gig implications.

Source: Alexandria Column: Gig Economy Hits Home

Progress Report: Data From 30 days of Title III Equity Crowdfunding – Crowdfund Insider

We’ve hit the one month mark since Title III became effective on May 16, 2016, and are just starting to see the first data points of this new industry. Here are some juicy statistics In the first 30 days of the filing’s becoming effective, 40 companies have become issuers using Title III (as of the writing of this article, that number has increased to 43 companies). Out of the gate, 27 companies were lined up

Source: Progress Report: Data From 30 days of Title III Equity Crowdfunding – Crowdfund Insider

Instacart is struggling to get its Uber-for-groceries model right in New York City

“As we cntinue to refine and improve our fulfillment model, we’ve found that our cashiers are often under-utilized and have unpredictable busy patterns,” Instacart writes in the email. “This results in long periods of idleness, with little or no work. Therefore, in an effort to ensure that all scheduled cashiers are fully utilized throughout their shifts, we plan to reduce the scheduled hours for cashiers.”

Instacart tells shoppers they will be evaluated on how quickly they ring up and bag items. Instacart’s email also notes that “advantages” of self checkout include “full ownership or your order,” “an additional marketable skill,” and “simplicity.”

Source: Instacart is struggling to get its Uber-for-groceries model right in New York City

Lyft and GM are expanding their car rental program into three more cities – Recode

This broadens the foundation for the company’s future on-demand network of self-driving cars.

Source: Lyft and GM are expanding their car rental program into three more cities – Recode

How Much Uber Drivers Actually Make

Uber drivers often trumpet the amount of money they’re making with the company. Often they’ve only been working for a short time, but they’ll regale you with stories of how great it is to work for the company. Uber has told the Wall Street Journal that their “typical” driver collects

Source: How Much Uber Drivers Actually Make

Google Local Pack To Get AdWords Ads

At SMX Advanced yesterday, Google announced that ads are coming to the local pack. That means one of the three local results in the local pack will be an ad and local SEOs need to make sure their cli

Source: Google Local Pack To Get AdWords Ads

The future of mobile: on-digital and on-demand – Telecom Tech News

CSPs are in danger of simply providing access to today’s popular real-time services without delivering a unique customer experience that subscribers see value in.

Source: The future of mobile: on-digital and on-demand – Telecom Tech News